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By Gordon Evans 02 Aug, 2017

I don't think anyone would like to claim a tax rebate. So, the latest fraudsters are texting or emailing people to tell them HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) owes them money – they just need to provide their personal details.

What you should look out for .....

The scam

A number of people have received false texts to their phone, claiming to be from HMRC. If you get one of these texts, they claim you’re due a tax rebate and you just need to click the link provided to receive it.

The link takes you to a fake website designed to look like an official HMRC page. It asks for personal information such as your bank or credit card details. Fraudsters can then use this information to gain access to your accounts. In the last year alone, HMRC has closed down more than 14,000 fake websites

Scammers don’t only target their victims through text but through phishing emails as well. Action Fraud says it’s received hundreds of reports of fake emails sent claiming to be from the council and promising tax rebates. It believes fraudsters are trying to take advantage of the change in tax year.

Another common tactic is for fraudsters to call up victims and pretend they’re from the council. They tell them they’re in the wrong council tax bracket and are due a tax rebate. To receive this rebate, they’ll ask you to pay an administration fee. 

How to spot a tax scam

As conmen are using the promise of a tax rebate to lure in victims, remember the following ..........

HMRC will never use texts or emails to:

• tell you about a tax rebate or penalty, or

• ask for personal or payment information.

You can receive a genuine text or email from HMRC for a number of reasons. Most of the communication that you’ll receive will be a reminder. For example, HMRC can send out a text when it’s time to renew your tax credits or an email letting you know that the VAT return is due.

What it will never do is attach a document or include a link in a text or email. You’ll never receive a phone call from your local council to discuss a council tax rebate either. Put the phone down if you receive a call like this.

Already fallen victim to a scam like this?  

Make sure others are aware of it by reporting it to Action Fraud using their online tool .

Hope this helps in keeping your information safe, but if you need any other advice on this sort of scam, give Paul a call on 07870 389246

By Gordon Evans 23 Jul, 2017
Let's put this in perspective .....

  • ALL faults in computers and laptops CAN be repaired - but at a cost! Some are software related such as corrupted files or virus attacks and can be solved at a nominal rate of around £30 - £50.
  • "Simple" hardware faults like broken screens, faulty power connectors and battery replacements cost around £45 - £95.
  • More complex faults such as hard drive failure or motherboard/processor failures are more expensive at around £75 to £150.
That's a lot of money and so many times have I been told by a customer ".. but I can get a new one for £200" - Think very carefully, and take a GOOD look at the specifications of these machines.

Yes, you can buy a new machine for this amount of money, but don't expect to be able to play complex games or do your accounts or your kids involved homework, or even watch high quality streaming video, and they are sooo slow! It is insulting to see them labelled as "laptops" or "computers" as they are nothing more than a netbook and word processor! Fine, if that's all you want from a computer, but why not buy a cheap tablet instead.

They are designed purely for browsing the internet and typing letters.

The 2 or 3 year old machine that cost you £400+ when it was new and needs some TLC, is still far superior to any £200 - £300 new piece of kit that is currently available - oh, and don't forget the extras that they will sell you like Office, Word, Internet security ... and the cost of transferring the data off your old computer - these can set you back another £100 -£200!

So, please, consider carefully before scrapping the old faithful machine and also think of the environment. The landfill sites are full of perfectly good laptops and computers!

  New is not always best!

If you need more information, or have a computer that needs a repair, please call 07870 389246 or contact me using the form here

Scroll down or pick a topic from the left hand side

By Gordon Evans 02 Aug, 2017

I don't think anyone would like to claim a tax rebate. So, the latest fraudsters are texting or emailing people to tell them HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) owes them money – they just need to provide their personal details.

What you should look out for .....

The scam

A number of people have received false texts to their phone, claiming to be from HMRC. If you get one of these texts, they claim you’re due a tax rebate and you just need to click the link provided to receive it.

The link takes you to a fake website designed to look like an official HMRC page. It asks for personal information such as your bank or credit card details. Fraudsters can then use this information to gain access to your accounts. In the last year alone, HMRC has closed down more than 14,000 fake websites

Scammers don’t only target their victims through text but through phishing emails as well. Action Fraud says it’s received hundreds of reports of fake emails sent claiming to be from the council and promising tax rebates. It believes fraudsters are trying to take advantage of the change in tax year.

Another common tactic is for fraudsters to call up victims and pretend they’re from the council. They tell them they’re in the wrong council tax bracket and are due a tax rebate. To receive this rebate, they’ll ask you to pay an administration fee. 

How to spot a tax scam

As conmen are using the promise of a tax rebate to lure in victims, remember the following ..........

HMRC will never use texts or emails to:

• tell you about a tax rebate or penalty, or

• ask for personal or payment information.

You can receive a genuine text or email from HMRC for a number of reasons. Most of the communication that you’ll receive will be a reminder. For example, HMRC can send out a text when it’s time to renew your tax credits or an email letting you know that the VAT return is due.

What it will never do is attach a document or include a link in a text or email. You’ll never receive a phone call from your local council to discuss a council tax rebate either. Put the phone down if you receive a call like this.

Already fallen victim to a scam like this?  

Make sure others are aware of it by reporting it to Action Fraud using their online tool .

Hope this helps in keeping your information safe, but if you need any other advice on this sort of scam, give Paul a call on 07870 389246

By Gordon Evans 23 Jul, 2017
Let's put this in perspective .....

  • ALL faults in computers and laptops CAN be repaired - but at a cost! Some are software related such as corrupted files or virus attacks and can be solved at a nominal rate of around £30 - £50.
  • "Simple" hardware faults like broken screens, faulty power connectors and battery replacements cost around £45 - £95.
  • More complex faults such as hard drive failure or motherboard/processor failures are more expensive at around £75 to £150.
That's a lot of money and so many times have I been told by a customer ".. but I can get a new one for £200" - Think very carefully, and take a GOOD look at the specifications of these machines.

Yes, you can buy a new machine for this amount of money, but don't expect to be able to play complex games or do your accounts or your kids involved homework, or even watch high quality streaming video, and they are sooo slow! It is insulting to see them labelled as "laptops" or "computers" as they are nothing more than a netbook and word processor! Fine, if that's all you want from a computer, but why not buy a cheap tablet instead.

They are designed purely for browsing the internet and typing letters.

The 2 or 3 year old machine that cost you £400+ when it was new and needs some TLC, is still far superior to any £200 - £300 new piece of kit that is currently available - oh, and don't forget the extras that they will sell you like Office, Word, Internet security ... and the cost of transferring the data off your old computer - these can set you back another £100 -£200!

So, please, consider carefully before scrapping the old faithful machine and also think of the environment. The landfill sites are full of perfectly good laptops and computers!

  New is not always best!

If you need more information, or have a computer that needs a repair, please call 07870 389246 or contact me using the form here
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